Garden Party

“We’re all mad here.”
“But, I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.
“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”
“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.
“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”
                                                             
                                                       ~Lewis Carroll – Alice in Wonderland
 

Mad, Fearless artArtists are an insecure bunch. Not all, but many seek constant reassurance and direction. Newer artists may do it incessantly. They’re liable to make a career out of “what do you think?” and lose the spirit that had them fearlessly making art in the first place.

Some time ago, I made a vow to liver fearlessly…Freudian typo.
This was not entirely possible without reconciling myself to a certain degree of madness. While the decision to live fearlessly included putting myself and my art “out there,” it did not preclude the insecurity that would accompany “spreading my wares” before the masses, showing artwork publically, and the challenges of defining and refining my artistic “voice.” I also didn’t count on the Ego voicing Her rather paranoid concerns. As the stakes got higher, Her inflated decibels were on a mission to drown out reason. My motto – Starve the Ego, feed the Muse. (click to Tweet) Continue reading “Garden Party”

Filling the Solo Cup

(This is a repost from July of 2013. The information is still relevant today, especially if you’re  working alone…feel free to comment or share the post with others who may benefit. ~m)

Working AloneI work alone.  Mostly, I write alone. I paint alone, and that’s the way I like it. Sometimes I’m coaching others, and I really love it.  However, most of my day is spent in my own company…and I’m an extrovert. I think. I was.

I have conversations with my “Studio Dogs.”(click to Tweet). We listen to music in the studio and I sometimes dance with them. Maybe I talk to them too much. They don’t complain. Continue reading “Filling the Solo Cup”

Make a Statement – Writing the Artist’s Statement

Writing your artist's statementDisclaimer: No babies were eaten by sharks in the writing of this blogpost. 

Does the thought of writing an artist’s statement make you run for high ground? Sometimes, visual geniuses, like you, will not take swimmingly to the “fodder of word water.” For some, they find it cold and uninviting.

Artist’s statements are short statements written about your body of work. They demonstrate and communicate your deliberate intention when creating the work and give the viewer some insight into you, your process and the work they are viewing. It is simply what, why and how you do what you do.  None of it is too in depth. It is a concise statement – only one to two paragraphs – so people can feel like they know something about you and understand a bit about your work and the intention you had when creating it. The artist’s statement should be designed to make people want to see more of your work (click to Tweet).

To write a successful statement, you need to stay out of shark infested waters. The artist’s statement should not sound pseudo intellectual. Don’t get full of yourself and try to talk over people’s heads – it’s rude. Keep controversial statements and biographical details OUT of your artist’s statement. We have bios, resumes and statements of work to cover those bases. I KNOW, now it writing your artist's statementsounds like you’re writing a book, right? Nope. This is just an artist’s statement, but it’s the foundation of your work, personal vision and business. The artist’s statement is a blueprint for you to clarify your own goals and intentions and share them with galleries, museums, potential collectors, viewers and other artists – all of which are potential business partners!

Artist’s statements are fluid. They evolve over your career and are revised as you and your work grow. Their evolution serves as a fantastic, historical document of your career…oooh, that sounds scary. I shouldn’t have put that in…who wants to write one now? Don’t recoil! Here are some floatation tips that will have you free-styling in no time:

  • Your first draft is your first draft – it’s gesso – don’t sweat it (click to Tweet)
  • Write the statement in first person. It’s about you, so use the pronoun “I”
  • When writing, focus on your current body of work
  • This statement is a “small work” with BIG impact. 2 paragraphs should do it justice. If you’re really good, one paragraph can nail it. Grab the reader’s attention from the beginning.
  • Stick to what you do, how you do it and why. It’s about you and your artistic process.
  • After the first draft take some time away from your statement. Your fresh eyes will be an asset later.
  • Return to the statement to fill it with high impact words and prune the unnecessary details.
  • Ask people you trust to look it over for you. Make sure your spelling, grammar and context are good. If you’re really having trouble, get professional help. Many art organizations teach professional development classes.  I know, because I teach some of those classes.
  • Revisit your artist’s statement and revise it at least once a year or more often, as needed.
  • Include a picture. Of yourself. People like to see the artist.

So, go ahead, write your artist statement…just the first draft. Next week I’m adding to this foundational principle, so check again, or subscribe to the blog so you can learn how to maximize your branding.

Don’t Bail! Make a Statement!

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Michelle Andres is a coach, writer and artist who nudges, nay, shoves creatives in the direction of their Art coaching, building your art business, belongingnessdreams by helping them improve productivity by helping them form good behaviours and eliminating poor ones. Follow her on Facebook on Twitter

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As Good As Goaled

Magical bookMany years ago, I opened a volume of poetry and prayers and a colourful, folded, Post-It note fell out. On this paper I had written 5 things I wanted to accomplish. I’d  written them, tucked them into the book and forgotten all about them. They incubated on the bookshelf for 2 years, then, voila, were rediscovered. DONE. COMPLETE. FINITO.

Has this ever happened to you? When it does, it feels like there’s some divine purpose behind it. I’ve experienced this phenomenon multiple times and when it happens, I’m always surprised at how my life has moved in the direction of the intent.  The simple act, the intention, written on a piece of paper has a kind of power in itself. It works.

I’m a coach, who is also an artist, and have spent years in corporate leadership. I’ve learned a few things about goal setting and I’ve witnessed plenty of successes (and failures). While the note hiding method is often successful, in my daily business I’d hate to rely on it 100%.  Goals without documentation are simply “wishes.” And wishes, my friends, get lost on the wind.

It’s true.

Solo-preneurs, artists, self-employed, hardworking peasants, we all have so much to do, so many hats to wear and so many If its important picexcuses at our disposal for not getting things done. It’s easy to fudge. No one is watching.  No one will tattle. Sometimes, something has to give, so we sacrifice our art, our business, our to do list…because we are the ones with the “flexibility.” Sooner or later the knowledge we do not fulfill self-made promises slowly erodes our sense of accomplishment, the health of our business and our self respect.

That’s true, too.

I like numbers. They’re definite. Here are some interesting ones:

  • Simply thinking about your goals will give you an average 43% chance of achieving them.
  •  If you want something and write it down with a detailed commitment,  you’ll be 64% more likely to succeed.
  •  If you write your goal down with a detailed commitment, share it with a trusted advisor and state a date to report back,  your likelihood of accomplishing your goal jumps to 76%! BAM!!!                                         

SMART goals pic

    Source – Dominican College of California

I’ve read statistics that are even higher for the last option….like 94%! But, writing your goals isn’t enough. Goals need to be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time sensitive. You know, SMART.  “I will work for 6 hours in my studio, 4 days a week on art producing activities and complete 1,500 works per month. “Is it SMART? Mostly it is, except if I only have 96 hours a month of production time, I’m probably NOT going to finish 1,500 pieces. So, I need to make some adjustments. 12 pieces? YES! 20 pieces? Maybe. Stretch yourself a bit. This is personal, it’s about you and it’s about you pushing yourself “just enough.” It has to hurt a little. It’s the rule. Especially for me…a recovering Catholic and recovering perfectionist.

Think of what you want to do with your talents, your ideas, your business. Create goals specific to support these dreams. Then, approach each day with a “To Do List” that supports the goals you’ve set to drive your business, develop your skill sets and address other relevant issues. Work on it. Everyday. Report the outcome to the person you told about the plan. Check it out! Now, you run the risk of actual SUCCESS.

So, focus on what you want to achieve. Create a SMART goal driven game plan, go to work and be persistent and at the end of the day, reward yourself for staying on track by sipping the sweet nectar of success.

You’re as good as goaled.

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Michelle Andres is a coach, writer and artist who champions others to follow the path less traveled; the path that leads straight to Coaching pic  - Version 3their joyful hearts.♥

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