Hold On To Your Hat

Wearing too many hats Sometimes, life gets crazy. You know what I mean. We artists have to wear many hats. Of course, we want to stop the “Glorification of busy.” It seems to have become either a disease or a badge of honor in our society to be “too busy.” Well, I say, “Poop on you people.” Are you the same grouchy, inflated, overworked egos that don’t have time to enjoy these beautiful spring blossoms or take a moment to swing at the park? Please, please, don’t get so busy you forget how to be civil or have a run of fun now and then.

Seriously, this week I’m busy…mad as a hatter. I’m in the middle of moving a studio, preparing for a couple art shows, an open studio event, and I have an April vacation scheduled, so I can’t drag my feet. But, 

Today I picked up the keys to my new studio space. The professionally crafted sign was picked up. I scored a cool wall decal, compliments of my friend, Tony. Everything is going to be very nice…then…I noticed the walls. Being an “art studio” the walls were full of holes, and scabs where they had been repeatedly patched. They were dirty. I’m preparing for a studio warming in this space. What’s a girl to do?

After much, well, some, no, a little thought, this girl added ONE MORE THING TO THE “TO DO” LIST. (click to Tweet)

That’s right. Tomorrow morning, I’m painting; because presentation is everything. Remember – quality of work should not suffer for an overcommitted schedule?

What is your work as an artist?

Wearing many hatsCertainly the medium of your choice is your work. You wouldn’t produce shoddy artwork and expect people to respect you. But, your work involves so many aspects beyond your art. As I said, we wear many hats. Your work includes the presentation of your art, how you manage your “Gallery” in your studio and online, how you handle monetary transactions, how you follow up purchases and handle commissions. Your work includes marketing, research and getting your tax receipts together…yes, it’s March 21st and yes, I did say that. (If you’ve already file – hats off to you!) Your work involves photographing your treasures, cataloguing them, managing your inventory and keeping an eye on the calendar for upcoming events and submissions. You are a project manager, a program analyst, a public relations expert and an accountant. Your work includes the environment you provide for people in your space (event planner) – while you may or may not agree, it does. Your work includes the quality of interactions you have with potential collectors and gallery owners (sales guy/therapist).

If you cannot afford to hire someone to do the tasks above for you…responsibility for that work falls squarely on your Studio beforeshoulders. Are YOU busy yet? By the way, if you’re having an open studio see my tips and make it an “event.” If it’s old hat to you, don’t bother to read it.

Sure, spring fever has me tightly in its grasp and I’m dying to don my sun bonnet, but because I produce my best art, I must show it in the best way possible. I must practice the same diligent eye for detail I have in my artwork with the rest of my business. It doesn’t take a lot of money, just some attention and <sigh> time.

Sometimes you just have to suck it up and go the extra mile…because it’s the right thing to do. In the meantime, the swings will have to wait and I’ll sniff a bloom or two on my way to grab the paint can and roller.

It’s beginning to feel like old hat now, 

Coaching

 

 

Michelle Andres is a writer, artist and coach who nudges, nay, shoves, her clients in the direction of their dreams, Writer, Artist, Coachhelping them to overcome non-productive behaviours and enjoy more success in their lives. 

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7 Replies to “Hold On To Your Hat”

  1. being an artist definitely isn’t for the faint of heart. Instead of painting our new digs, we covered the patches with art.

    I can’t wait to see your new space. I know it will be wonderful.

  2. LOL! Jill, after my misadventures yesterday painting the walls, it might have been a preferable option to cover the roughs sports with art! I got the wrong paint, ran out of the right paint…but it’s finally done and I feel good about it. Thank you for your suggestion!

  3. Hang in there Michelle… I don’t have a studio… I have a notebook and pencils… My three boys keep me secretively arting for now and that’s okay! I guess I look around and realise that as an artist before kids and an artist now – I realise that the studio matters for presentation yes, but what is wrong with a showing under a tree? or down an alley? pop up art showing – 1 hour and it disappears? I am wonder if we place too much presentation on what we think “the world” expects and not what “the world” expects from an artist! Why can’t an art showing be completely peculiar to an artist and not appear as all the other presentations in the world? Just sayin.

  4. Interesting thoughts, Tania. It is the venue and expectation, not the act of producing the art itself, I suppose. I have even participated in “Abandoning Art.” I once left a mosaic in a restaurant for the “Finder” to keep or give to someone else. It’s a fun idea. Thanks for reminding us of the many ways our creations can be enjoyed!

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